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Friday, September 25, 2015

JKLM ENERGY, LLC STATEMENT ON WATER SAMPLING PROGRAM

No Isopropanol Present in Five of Six Initial Well Water Samples Closest to Drilling Location

WEXFORD, Pa. (Sept.25) – JKLM Energy, LLC today announced laboratory results from six water sources that had the potential for groundwater contamination. These results included four of five private water wells with foamy characteristics for the presence of isopropanol, the chemical of principal concern in the incident, which was not detected in those four wells. 

The material was also not detected in a sample collected from a spring located in the area of the investigation.

The private well with foam closest to the drill site contained 15 ppm (parts per million) of isopropanol, which is at the Act 2 standard for aquifers serving residential uses. This is consistent with the belief that the aquifer would continue to disperse and degrade the isopropanol as it is transported through the aquifer by means of normal water flow.

A claim made that two public water supplies have been “impacted” by this incident misrepresents facts and is spreading unnecessary concerns. JKLM is working closely with the Coudersport Borough Water System, the Charles Cole Memorial Hospital and other entities to ensure their water supply is both safe and adequate. The company also continues to share all information about water sampling results with the borough, the hospital and other stakeholders.

A second claim, that the chemical involved in this incident is “typically used for fracking infiltrated shallow and subsurface groundwater aquifers” is also inaccurate. This natural gas well was not being hydraulically fractured, and these surfactants are commonly used when developing wells on compressed air during the early stages of drilling.

While the surfactant involved is used in certain stages of drilling natural gas wells, it is not on the list of materials approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) for use at this point in the drilling process.

JKLM is reviewing the procedures that resulted in the use of the material and will provide that information to the DEP.

Water sampling is continuing at sources that have the potential to experience impacts. Those results will be shared with the community through a daily update provided by JKLM and posted on a project website, which will be available to the public shortly.

5 comments :

Anonymous said...

Thought you were going to get to the bottom of this and tell us all about it by this morning. .Could it be the facts were not what you would have had us believe yesterday?Well Miss Troutman?

Anonymous said...

This is the first time that public water supplies have been impacted to the point of being shut down due to potential groundwater contamination from unconventional oil and gas operations.
So far, the chemical Isopropanol JKLM poured into an uncased well bore at around 600ft has been detected in one of six residential water supplies at 15ppm (parts per million). Isopropanol is listed as a corrosion inhibitor by the FracFocus Chemical Disclosure Registry and commonly used in hydraulic fracturing.
But JKLM has been denying its connection to fracking, referring to it mainly as a “soap” surfactant and a substance unlikely to be harmful due to dilution.
Statements recently released by JKLM that go after Public Herald’s reports, “A second claim, that the chemical involved in this incident is “typically used for fracking infiltrated shallow and subsurface groundwater aquifers” is also inaccurate. This natural gas well was not being hydraulically fractured, and these surfactants are commonly used when developing wells on compressed air during the early stages of drilling.”
In contrast to JKLM downplaying concerns of the chemical appearing in area water supplies, resident complaints reported foaming in households and ponds.

Anonymous said...

Looks like we sort of dodged the bullet when it comes to environmental impact. Hopefully we can learn from this and improve how these wells are drilled.

Dean Marshall said...

Dodged a bullet? Making that absurd claim while the investigation,( and sure to follow coverup) is ongoing is ludicrous at best. Best advice, rescind JKLM Drilling Permits and shut them Down BEFORE that "bullet" ends up as a time bomb!

Melissa said...

JKLM's claim that Public Herald's "claim" that "the chemical involved in this incident is 'typically used for fracking infiltrated shallow and subsurface groundwater aquifers' is also inaccurate"...is itself entirely inaccurate at best and disingenuous propaganda for worse.

Bachman Services, Inc., the manufacturer of the surfactant used during drilling operations by JKLM, lists "surfactact & foaming agents" under "fracturing & acidizing" products NOT "drilling" products. See for yourself here:http://www.bachmanservices.com/products.htm

JKLM's community outreach office identified Bachman Services as the manufacturer.

Also, isopropanol, the only chemical of "concern" disclosed by JKLM (others chemicals are "proprietary") is listed on the oil and gas industry website FracFocus as a fluid "routinely used in hydraulic fracturing." See for yourself here: https://fracfocus.org/chemical-use/what-chemicals-are-used

So, JKLM, tell the public again that isopropanol is NOT "typically used for fracking." Or, are your ready to admit that your claims are inaccurate, at best.

You can read Public Herald's entire report here -- all facts, no industry propaganda -- http://publicherald.org/breaking-oil-gas-drilling-impacts-public-drinking-water-supplies-in-potter-county/

We'll publish a second report early morning this coming Monday, Oct. 26th.

=** The more you know **=