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Monday, August 22, 2016

Energy Efficiency and Economic Benefits Emphasized in DEP’s 2015 Climate Change Action Plan Update

Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today accepted the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) 2015 Climate Change Action Plan Update that details how increasing energy efficiency in all sectors and at all levels will play a key role in reducing Pennsylvania’s greenhouse gas emissions by target year 2030.

The Pennsylvania Climate Change Act of 2008 mandated the Climate Change Action Plan in 2009 as well as updates every three years. The 2015 update presents data from the EPA State Inventory Tool for 2000 through 2012 (the most recent data available), showing an overall decrease of 15.93 percent in net emissions, reflecting a shift by some power plants from coal to natural gas, as well as the success of Pennsylvania’s energy efficiency programs. Overall, Pennsylvania’s total greenhouse emissions are projected to be lower in 2030 than in 2000, with reductions in the residential, commercial, transportation, agriculture and waste sectors.

“Addressing climate change and the real impact on the health of our citizens, the costs of our businesses and the environment must be a priority for not just the commonwealth, but all sectors,” Governor Wolf said.

The update presents 13 work plans to further reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 2030. An economic analysis of the work plans included in the Plan shows that the majority have the potential to generate not only greenhouse gas emissions reductions but also significant improvements in total employment, total income and real disposable personal income.

With Pennsylvania being the third largest emitter of energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in the country, additional reductions are needed. Pennsylvania will be 3°C (5.4°F) warmer by 2050 than it was in 2000, according to the 2015 Climate Impacts Assessment Report by the Penn State University Environment and Natural Resources Institute. The result will be dangerously high summer temperatures and more severe storms, increased threat of certain insect-borne diseases, and drastic changes to agriculture and water quality.

“The consequences of inaction on climate change will be felt by all Pennsylvanians,” said DEP Acting Secretary McDonnell, “It will affect the food we grow, the energy we use, our recreation, and even our health.”

The majority of work plans in the 2015 Climate Change Action Plan Update focus on energy efficiency measures. The greatest emissions reductions would be achieved by holding new buildings to an emissions performance standard 60 percent lower than the regional average. Sizable emissions reduction would also be attained by continuing Act 129 of 2008, which requires utilities to come up with plans to encourage energy efficiency among their customers, through 2031.

Other work plans address coal mine methane recovery, the latest building energy codes, heating oil conservation and fuel switching, combined heat and power systems, ground source heat pumps, energy technical assistance for manufacturers, tree-planting programs, energy efficiency financing for homeowners, semi-truck adaptations, and anaerobic manure digesters.

The plans were created in partnership with the Climate Change Advisory Committee, whose members include the secretaries of the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources and Department of Community and Economic Development; the chair of the Public Utilities Commission; and Governor’s Office and legislative appointees. All plans were voted on, with most approved unanimously.

The Center for Climate Strategies conducted macroeconomic analyses to determine the potential costs, benefits, and job impacts of the work plans. In addition to environmental benefits, the analysis shows economic benefits, including increased jobs.

Highlighting the important role that all Pennsylvanians play in helping to lower emissions, the update includes 25 actions individuals can take, including lowering their energy use, finding energy efficiency financing, reducing food waste, and planting trees to absorb carbon.

3 comments :

Anonymous said...

Lowering emissions by consumer usage being the most prevalent opinion of this article is putting too much of the burden on common man. The regulations that really need addressing are the producers. Otherwise known as drillers of natural gas and the creators of much abused regulations of their procedures. The common,opinion has been just minimal amounts of contamination is created by these violations, however when continuing violations occur, the poisions that are created by so called accidents emissions are a staggering amount of accumulated damage not even Addressed! Why are we as consumers put in the position of the cause of contamination,when the violations are occurring at the beginning of the process, rather than after the production of these contaminates doesn't make sense. We all loose with this procedure being prominent in the industry. Do the investigation needed with an open mind. It might just be part of the cause, believe it or not!

Anonymous said...

This will lead to much higher energy costs squeezing more elderly people out of their homes.

Anonymous said...

Climate change, (global warming) is a myth. Go back to saving the whales.