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Tuesday, November 8, 2016

ELK HARVEST RESULTS RELEASED

Twenty-four bulls taken in one-week season; harvest totals 97 elk.


More than 78 percent of the hunters participating in Pennsylvania’s 2016 elk hunt have taken home a trophy.

The Pennsylvania Game Commission today announced 97 elk were taken by hunters during the regular one-week elk season that ended Nov. 5. And for those licensed to hunt antlered elk, also known as bulls, the success rate was 96 percent.

The 2016 harvest included some large elk. Fourteen bulls each were estimated to weigh 700 pounds or more, with two going more than 800 pounds. The heaviest bull taken in this year’s hunt was estimated at 824 pounds. That bull, which sported a 9-by-8 rack, was taken Oct. 31 by Stephen Winter, of Perkasie.

The other 800-plus-pound bull (813 pounds), which had a 7-by-8 rack, was harvested with a bow on Nov. 4 by Steven Armburger, of Guys Mills.

The largest bull in terms of rack size was a 9-by-8, harvested Nov. 2 by Joshua Fuqua, of Clymer. Its rack initially was measured at 418-6/8 inches, according to Boone & Crockett big-game scoring standards.

The second-highest-scoring bull, taken on Oct. 31, by Donald Newman, of Andreas, had an 8-by-9 rack initially measured at 407-2/8 inches. That bull weighed 776 pounds.

Official measurements of these bulls cannot be taken until the antlers have air dried for at least 60 days after the animal was killed. Pennsylvania elk are well represented in the Boone & Crockett Club’s records, and in the state record book.

Other large bulls taken include a 6-by-7 weighing 797 pounds taken by Michael Baer, of Waynesboro; a 6-by-7 weighing 761 pounds taken by Mark Butcher, of Newport; a 6-by-7 weighing 745 pounds taken by Israel Messinger, of Palmerton; a 6-by-6 weighing 741 pounds taken by Paul Scansaroli, of Downingtown; and a 6-by-6 also weighing 741 pounds taken by Eddy Stamm, of Jersey Shore.

There also were some large antlerless elk taken in the harvest. Eleven of the 73 cows taken by hunters during the one-week season weighed over 500 pounds.

Fifty-six elk— 10 bulls and 46 cows — of the 97 harvested were taken on the opening day of the elk season Oct. 31.

To participate in the elk hunt, hunters must submit an application, then must be selected through a random drawing and purchase a license. The drawing annually attracts more than 30,000 applicants.

12 comments :

Anonymous said...

Did they at least un-tie them from the tree before they shot them??. Or did they just pet them first then shoot ??? Pitiful!!!

Anonymous said...

Must be a clinton voter ^^^^

Anonymous said...

I like the article about the guy shooting an elk with his guide, son, brother, nephew, neighbor, wife, and reporter watching as the elk stood still at 200 yards away (feeding) and unafraid. What a joke. I am embarrassed for him.

Anonymous said...

Let me guess.
5:38 has no idea what they're talking about.

Anonymous said...

I think5.38 nails it on the Head! 6.03 yours is great too. Then they all get together and brag about the BIG HUNT and how hard they had to work to chase then down for many miles!

Anonymous said...

I would like to know if they remove the electronic collar before or after the elk is shot? Does the shooter get to keep the collar if its still on the elk?

Anonymous said...

I'd be embarrassed to shoot one of these animals. 96%? What a joke. The Game Commission should be ashamed to even publicize the Elk "hunt".

Anonymous said...

Might as well take Grandma out in the yard and shoot her.

Brother Nature said...

Better yet, make the hunters use a spear to kill the elk. At least that would be a little bit sporting. The hunters and the Game Commission should be ashamed of this.

Anonymous said...

I have a farm with a lot of land. Could I sell chances to come onto my farm and shoot an Angus beef ? I think I could make money if it was a lottery and the shooter kept the animal.
Sell maybe 2000 chances for $5 each. or $10
I could even chase them a little with my tractor before the hunter shot them.

Anonymous said...

Big bad hunter pulls up the Elk stares at him because there use to people watching him then he blows him away! Then they get there name and picture in the paper bragging how hard it was to kill it! You might have just drove to a zoo and done the same thing! I voted for Trump and I'm not against hunting. I'm against killing the Elk in that area! Tranquilize a few and relocate them.

Anonymous said...

Clearly the above people that commented are the part of the tourist group that never leave their car. Yes there are elk that have no fear of humans,and they are mainly around Winslow hill. We have went out in search of elk to photograph them in areas other then Winslow hill and Benezette(where they are not allower to be hunted) and if you so much as get up wind of them they smell you and take off. They are not "tame" at all in areas other then the tourist areas you obviously visit. GO find an elk up in Hicks run. if you even stop your car to look at them take off. Look at the hunting results,there are several tags that were not filled,soooo obviously it's not as easy as you tourist think it is.