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Friday, July 18, 2008

Jules Delgotto Writes/ Sends Links

Is this what is going to replace our God given mountains?

http://apnews.myway.com/image/20080717/Wind_Power.sff_NYBZ173_20080717125237.html?date=20080717&docid=D91VR9N80


http://apnews.myway.com/article/20080717/D91VR9N80.html

Anonymous said...

Because this looks much better...
http://keetsa.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2007/09/pollution-systems.jpg

Anonymous said...

I don't understand. We complain about the cost of energy and polluting the environment but yet we don't want to allow something that would be beneficial to both? I guess it would be ok if it wasn't in our little piece of the world.

Anonymous said...

Thank you for the picture from a mattress store web site, it was almost meanacing, if you didn't know what you were looking at.

We as a county need to be selfish about our fragile countryside. we have no infrastructure, no major employers, we have no major attraction for todays employers to relocate here. All we have is what was given to us, the land.

We should not latch on to something that makes us feel good inside but brings little long term benefit directly to Potter County.

just my 2c NIMBY

Anonymous said...

At one point in time I considered my self an environmentalist. I have since come around this is just stupid. Wind power is clean and cheap and we need to build every wind mill we can while we still have the oil to do so. In fact I dare say I like the looks of these windmills. I would put one in my front yard. I hear the stories these are not the windmills of old they where pretty. Well there where idiots back then who hated them to. Yes I know it’s the sign of a bad debate to personally attack the other side but in order to have a debate you need to be rational NIMBY is not a rational concept as it is always someone’s back yard. We need to utilize or resources wisely, and hydro electric and wind are two of the best we have come up with so far.

Anonymous said...

With the set back distance our planning commission has proposed Potter County area will NOT look like this... We Need to use wind, solar and water energy.
Vicki Sherwood

Anonymous said...

I dare say some miss the point.

Our resourses in Potter County are the unspoiled natural beauty of the ridges, valleys and hilltops.

Any time spent in suburbia will make one appreciate the Potter County Countryside. We take it so much for granted.

How do the wind turbine machines benefit Potter County?

I believe the local goverment may be able to stop this by instituting the power of eminent domain, not over all of the rights associated with the property ownership, but with the air rights of the area in question. ( Kelo v. City of New London, 545 U.S. 469 (2005))

The air rights would be taken for the public benefit. Us. Unpopular for some, beneficial for all longterm.

It's just a working theory at this point and it would take courage. Pass it on.

As far as energy, the recent exciting advances in solar panels will make the wind turbine machines. (not windmills, windmills is a fluff term used to soften the perception) look prehistoric.

Anonymous said...

Potter County threatened

There has never been an industrial threat quite like the wind turbines to Potter County’s future. It seems such a shame that our precious county, with all its appealing natural attractions, should be so carelessly jeopardized.

The financial enticements offered up by AES Corporation, a global energy conglomerate that doesn’t give one hoot about Potter County and its residents, cannot possibly offset all that is good about this special place at the top of the world.

In Ulysses and Hector Townships, more than 13,000 acres spread out over dozens of miles would be given over to the construction of 79 mammoth wind turbine generators, each equivalent in height to a 40-story metropolitan office building.

If this industrial wind installation is allowed to move forward, additional wind plants will be constructed in other sections of the county. Homer Township has already passed a “come on in” wind ordinance that will place turbines on the south side of Coudersport, twice as close to residences as even the wind companies proposed. Unbelievable! Other turbine sites are being considered in Hebron, Eulalia and Sweden townships.

These wind installations are close to Cherry Springs and there will be no way to protect the park’s dark skies or the Pennsylvania Wilds. Dutch Hill, in Homer Township, is located just six miles from Cherry Springs. These turbines will be clearly visible from Coudersport and very possibly Cherry Springs.

Here’s what we will get in exchange for losing the dark skies and our beautiful ridgetops:

• Noise. AES claims its turbine generators do not cause excessive noise. But there are currently people all over the world filing lawsuits against wind developers who said the same thing. Their lives are ruined by the noise. Because the turbine generators are already up, it is too late for them.

• An increase in electric bills on top of the increases that are predicted after the caps come off in 2011, because wind-generated electricity is very expensive to produce and the electric companies are forced to buy this power at above wholesale rates.

• No appreciable decrease in carbon dioxide emissions, because “when the wind don’t blow, the power don’t flow,” causing a backup conventional power plant to run all the time.

(Also keep in mind that the ramping up and down of coal-burning power plants produces more carbon dioxide emissions as it tries to keep up with the erratic performance of the turbines.)

• No local jobs of any significance. The turbines are erected and maintained by outside professional contractors.

• No significant tax revenue. The turbines themselves are tax-exempt because they are considered equipment, not real estate.

• Devaluation of millions of dollars in real estate around the turbines (even though the wind industry tries to prove otherwise with slanted surveys). Dozens of home owners who live in close proximity to industrial wind installations have learned this already. Why some people believe that having a 410-foot turbine generator situated 1,300 feet from the nearest home will increase its value astonishes me.

• Potential compromise of the dark skies at Cherry Springs.

Potter County has too much to lose. We need to stand together.

For details on how to join the fight, please send an email to savegodscountry@aol.com.

(Arthur Kear is a restaurant owner in Ulysses and active member of “Save God’s Country,” a citizens group formed to battle an industrial wind installation in the Ulysses area. He lives in the area being targeted by energy company AES Corporation for approximately 80 turbines)

Endeavor News

12 July 2008

Anonymous said...

Wind: Who are we?

Development of alternative energy is a complex issue and demands a response that is well researched, investigated and debated.

It does not call for a kneejerk reaction, giving an enormous handout to an industry (wind) whose contribution to our quest for clean energy is at best minimal, leaving in its wake a heavy widening scar across our land.

Sensitive ecosystems are being disrupted. Bird and bat mortality is a fact the industry can no longer deny. Human health and safety, and the basic right to enjoy our homes in relative peace, are being jeopardized, while industrial wind complexes are springing up as unwanted and intrusive “neighbors” in residential areas.

Yet, the industry attempts to trivialize valid concerns by labeling those who oppose as NIMBYs (”Not in MY back yard!).

The ridge tops of Potter and Tioga counties represent much more than just a back yard. Our unspoiled natural beauty is what makes us unique.

Robert F. Kennedy Jr., an environmental lawyer and professor at Pace University Law School, writes:

“All of us need periodically to experience wilderness to renew our spirits and reconnect ourselves to the common history of our nation, humanity and to God. The worst trap that environmentalists can fall into is the conviction that the only wilderness worth preserving is in the Rocky Mountains or Alaska. To the contrary, our most important wildernesses are those that are closest to our densest population centers.”

We are the home of the Pennsylvania Wilds. We are her caretakers.

To close, I’d like to borrow from a quote by Mark Walsh of Manchester, Vermont:

“Potter and Tioga County mountain ridges may not be as impressive as Yosemite’s El Capitan or the Grand Tetons, but something very real would be sacrificed on the questionable altar of renewable energy for profit. Potter and Tioga County mountain ridges are not just a back yard. They are a heritage and a legacy. And they are as good a place as any to make a stand.”

Preserve the beauty of our region. Say no to industrial wind.

Beth Ann Steffy
Mansfield

Endeavor News

12 July 2008

Wendy Erickson said...

Are you suggesting that you should be or are entitled to dictate what those private landowners on the hill can or cannot do with thier property? Have you ever excersised the thought that maybe those who live on the hill have spent years paying taxes on that hill for their right to be able to do with their property as they see fit. I think the real concern with property values will be if those who own more than a few acres are are told what they can or cannot have on thier property because that would render any smaller lots worthless for anything except drilling mock wells on to prove they have fresh water for no good reason. If you want to follow the money trail charity starts at home. If you want a view shed, go buy your own.

Anonymous said...

Paul, is that your comment??

10 comments :

Anonymous said...

Because this looks much better...
http://keetsa.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2007/09/pollution-systems.jpg

Anonymous said...

I don't understand. We complain about the cost of energy and polluting the environment but yet we don't want to allow something that would be beneficial to both? I guess it would be ok if it wasn't in our little piece of the world.

Anonymous said...

Thank you for the picture from a mattress store web site, it was almost meanacing, if you didn't know what you were looking at.

We as a county need to be selfish about our fragile countryside. we have no infrastructure, no major employers, we have no major attraction for todays employers to relocate here. All we have is what was given to us, the land.

We should not latch on to something that makes us feel good inside but brings little long term benefit directly to Potter County.

just my 2c NIMBY

Anonymous said...

At one point in time I considered my self an environmentalist. I have since come around this is just stupid. Wind power is clean and cheap and we need to build every wind mill we can while we still have the oil to do so. In fact I dare say I like the looks of these windmills. I would put one in my front yard. I hear the stories these are not the windmills of old they where pretty. Well there where idiots back then who hated them to. Yes I know it’s the sign of a bad debate to personally attack the other side but in order to have a debate you need to be rational NIMBY is not a rational concept as it is always someone’s back yard. We need to utilize or resources wisely, and hydro electric and wind are two of the best we have come up with so far.

Anonymous said...

With the set back distance our planning commission has proposed Potter County area will NOT look like this... We Need to use wind, solar and water energy.
Vicki Sherwood

Anonymous said...

I dare say some miss the point.

Our resourses in Potter County are the unspoiled natural beauty of the ridges, valleys and hilltops.

Any time spent in suburbia will make one appreciate the Potter County Countryside. We take it so much for granted.

How do the wind turbine machines benefit Potter County?

I believe the local goverment may be able to stop this by instituting the power of eminent domain, not over all of the rights associated with the property ownership, but with the air rights of the area in question. ( Kelo v. City of New London, 545 U.S. 469 (2005))

The air rights would be taken for the public benefit. Us. Unpopular for some, beneficial for all longterm.

It's just a working theory at this point and it would take courage. Pass it on.

As far as energy, the recent exciting advances in solar panels will make the wind turbine machines. (not windmills, windmills is a fluff term used to soften the perception) look prehistoric.

Anonymous said...

Potter County threatened

There has never been an industrial threat quite like the wind turbines to Potter County’s future. It seems such a shame that our precious county, with all its appealing natural attractions, should be so carelessly jeopardized.

The financial enticements offered up by AES Corporation, a global energy conglomerate that doesn’t give one hoot about Potter County and its residents, cannot possibly offset all that is good about this special place at the top of the world.

In Ulysses and Hector Townships, more than 13,000 acres spread out over dozens of miles would be given over to the construction of 79 mammoth wind turbine generators, each equivalent in height to a 40-story metropolitan office building.

If this industrial wind installation is allowed to move forward, additional wind plants will be constructed in other sections of the county. Homer Township has already passed a “come on in” wind ordinance that will place turbines on the south side of Coudersport, twice as close to residences as even the wind companies proposed. Unbelievable! Other turbine sites are being considered in Hebron, Eulalia and Sweden townships.

These wind installations are close to Cherry Springs and there will be no way to protect the park’s dark skies or the Pennsylvania Wilds. Dutch Hill, in Homer Township, is located just six miles from Cherry Springs. These turbines will be clearly visible from Coudersport and very possibly Cherry Springs.

Here’s what we will get in exchange for losing the dark skies and our beautiful ridgetops:

• Noise. AES claims its turbine generators do not cause excessive noise. But there are currently people all over the world filing lawsuits against wind developers who said the same thing. Their lives are ruined by the noise. Because the turbine generators are already up, it is too late for them.

• An increase in electric bills on top of the increases that are predicted after the caps come off in 2011, because wind-generated electricity is very expensive to produce and the electric companies are forced to buy this power at above wholesale rates.

• No appreciable decrease in carbon dioxide emissions, because “when the wind don’t blow, the power don’t flow,” causing a backup conventional power plant to run all the time.

(Also keep in mind that the ramping up and down of coal-burning power plants produces more carbon dioxide emissions as it tries to keep up with the erratic performance of the turbines.)

• No local jobs of any significance. The turbines are erected and maintained by outside professional contractors.

• No significant tax revenue. The turbines themselves are tax-exempt because they are considered equipment, not real estate.

• Devaluation of millions of dollars in real estate around the turbines (even though the wind industry tries to prove otherwise with slanted surveys). Dozens of home owners who live in close proximity to industrial wind installations have learned this already. Why some people believe that having a 410-foot turbine generator situated 1,300 feet from the nearest home will increase its value astonishes me.

• Potential compromise of the dark skies at Cherry Springs.

Potter County has too much to lose. We need to stand together.

For details on how to join the fight, please send an email to savegodscountry@aol.com.

(Arthur Kear is a restaurant owner in Ulysses and active member of “Save God’s Country,” a citizens group formed to battle an industrial wind installation in the Ulysses area. He lives in the area being targeted by energy company AES Corporation for approximately 80 turbines)

Endeavor News

12 July 2008

Anonymous said...

Wind: Who are we?

Development of alternative energy is a complex issue and demands a response that is well researched, investigated and debated.

It does not call for a kneejerk reaction, giving an enormous handout to an industry (wind) whose contribution to our quest for clean energy is at best minimal, leaving in its wake a heavy widening scar across our land.

Sensitive ecosystems are being disrupted. Bird and bat mortality is a fact the industry can no longer deny. Human health and safety, and the basic right to enjoy our homes in relative peace, are being jeopardized, while industrial wind complexes are springing up as unwanted and intrusive “neighbors” in residential areas.

Yet, the industry attempts to trivialize valid concerns by labeling those who oppose as NIMBYs (”Not in MY back yard!).

The ridge tops of Potter and Tioga counties represent much more than just a back yard. Our unspoiled natural beauty is what makes us unique.

Robert F. Kennedy Jr., an environmental lawyer and professor at Pace University Law School, writes:

“All of us need periodically to experience wilderness to renew our spirits and reconnect ourselves to the common history of our nation, humanity and to God. The worst trap that environmentalists can fall into is the conviction that the only wilderness worth preserving is in the Rocky Mountains or Alaska. To the contrary, our most important wildernesses are those that are closest to our densest population centers.”

We are the home of the Pennsylvania Wilds. We are her caretakers.

To close, I’d like to borrow from a quote by Mark Walsh of Manchester, Vermont:

“Potter and Tioga County mountain ridges may not be as impressive as Yosemite’s El Capitan or the Grand Tetons, but something very real would be sacrificed on the questionable altar of renewable energy for profit. Potter and Tioga County mountain ridges are not just a back yard. They are a heritage and a legacy. And they are as good a place as any to make a stand.”

Preserve the beauty of our region. Say no to industrial wind.

Beth Ann Steffy
Mansfield

Endeavor News

12 July 2008

Wendy Erickson said...

Are you suggesting that you should be or are entitled to dictate what those private landowners on the hill can or cannot do with thier property? Have you ever excersised the thought that maybe those who live on the hill have spent years paying taxes on that hill for their right to be able to do with their property as they see fit. I think the real concern with property values will be if those who own more than a few acres are are told what they can or cannot have on thier property because that would render any smaller lots worthless for anything except drilling mock wells on to prove they have fresh water for no good reason. If you want to follow the money trail charity starts at home. If you want a view shed, go buy your own.

Anonymous said...

Paul, is that your comment??