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Friday, January 8, 2010

State Burns Entire Forests, But Wants To Regulate Safe, Efficient Outdoor Wood Boilers

This smoke is from just a small brush pile burned for a gas well location, it is nothing compared to a whole forest burning.

Controlled wildfires can revive state forests, game lands
SOMETIMES, WILDFIRES CAN BE BENEFICIAL.(:15) A 95-ACRE BURN IS PLANNED FOR THE SCOTIA BARRENS IN CENTRE COUNTY. THIS PRESCRIBED BURN MAY BE THE FIRST OF MANY ACROSS PENNSYLVANIA. A RECENT CHANGE IN STATE LAWS NOW PERMITS STATE AGENCIES TO CONDUCT CONTROLLED BURNS ON FOREST AND GAME LANDS. PENN STATE FOREST ECOLOGIST MARGOT KAYE SAYS THESE BURNS ARE ECONOMICALLY EFFICIENT FOR LAND:

"It's a great tool, whether it's to promote regeneration of desirable forests, to improve wildlife habitat…and to reduce fuel accumulation.

"THE BURNS WILL REDUCE THE THREAT OF FUTURE WILDFIRES BY REMOVING FLAMMABLE DEBRIS IN A SUPERVISED ENVIRONMENT. IT WILL ALSO ENSURE FLAMES DON'T TRANSFER INTO A CANOPY BURN-WHICH IS MORE EASILY SPREAD AND HARDER TO CONTROL.

This release from the state last April takes all credibility away from shutting down outdoor wood boilers.

The smoke and products of combustion for burning these forests intentionally will produce more of what these people say is bad for us than all the wood burners in the Northern Tier Of Pennsylvania.

11 comments :

Anonymous said...

Jim, as of yesterday there were only 8 people signed up to speak at the meeting in Coudersport. C'mon folks, spend a few hours to keep our government from instituting new rules and regulations that make no commom sense in rural PA.

Anonymous said...

The state should pay the local logging industry to harvest the trees! If they are not going to bid it out, then help the economy and keep our men and women working in this state, what a joke!

Another example as "do as we say, not as we do" as far as the smoke!

Anonymous said...

life is just not always fare. it is do as I say not as I do. In my opinion our government can justify anything they want to do. Just con people into believing it's ok.

Anonymous said...

So this all comes down to "Do as I say, not as I do" routine. Go figure. Any way for the gov't to look good and beat the real people in this place.

Anonymous said...

Large difference in a normal class A combustible and burning plastic, trash, pressure treated lumber in a outside wood burner.

The Commonwealth of Pa. said...

I will do what I want, when I want, and charge you stupid taxpayers whatever I want for any reason I want and there isn't a damn thing you can do about it.

Anonymous said...

Don't be suprised if the State comes up with some kind of Grand Fathering Clause (FOR A FEE).

If they can find a way to squeeze a Buck out of you they will do it.

You will also be charged to operate a new installation.

Anonymous said...

Do as your told or Fast Eddie will get his way by threatening to cut some jobs.

Anonymous said...

Shall we put this in perspective or argue government interference ad nausem? Prescribed burns are an effective tool for forest regeneration and also for the protection of property. Example: California and Florida use burns extensively to protect property in highly flammable environments. The differences between a one-day prescribed burn, under controlled conditions, and a outdoor wood burning installation is apples and oranges. One day of smoke, in a less populated area vs acrid smoke from plastics, garbage, etc. blowing in someone's yard for a minimum of 3 months, daily, in northern PA is a world apart. Think about it and work together to come up with workable recommendations for wood burners, don't blame forest management practices, tried and true, for managing your forests and protecting your property.

Solomon's words for the wise said...

There are very few people who have outside wood burners who would burn the items you mention. Most people are responsible, and you are right, we should work together to resolve any problems with these heaters. They are safe, no co2 in the house, no fire in the house, no dirt and bark tracked thru. No smoke in the house when filling the stove. But laws state wide are ridiculous. It doesn't require one size fits all. Each installation is different. My lot is 85 feet wide, but an acre and a half deep. I would not be allowed to install a boiler, but if my lot was a different size, I could put one upwind of your front door, as long as I had a crane come in and installed a chimney 2 feet higher than your house. A downdraft would send all the smoke in your door. Does that make sense. Figure out how to make these boilers more efficient, don't make it impossible to use them. One size does not fit all. Regulations, if necessary should be developed locally, not in Harrisburg. I'm not ready to put the old wood stove back in the house. I like being warm in winter. I like not giving my money to the middle east to heat my home.

Anonymous said...

Why didn't they offer to sell the wood to the public? A few pieces of wood sure could come in handy when you want build a campfire when you visit our area and maybe spend a few buck to help our economy.