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Friday, February 7, 2014

PennDOT Offers Tips to Homeowners for a ‘Snow Plow-Friendly’ Mailbox





PennDOT Offers Tips to Homeowners for a ‘Snow Plow-Friendly’ Mailbox


As we make our way through winter, PennDOT District 2 is reminding homeowners living along state routes to make sure their mailbox is “snow plow-friendly.”

As always, PennDOT’s goal for winter is to maintain safe and passable roads. During snowy weather, maintaining passable roads often requires plowing the snow to the edge of the shoulder of the road. Because most mailboxes are placed within PennDOT’s legal right of way, it is up to the homeowner to make certain that their mailbox can withstand snow being thrown from a passing snow plow. Snow plow operators normally maintain lower speeds when plowing in areas where mailboxes are present. Occasionally, higher speeds are required to effectively plow heavy or wet snow. Usually, if a mailbox is placed as far back from the shoulder of the road as a letter carrier can reach, and is firmly supported, it should survive the winter.

PennDOT offers the following tips to homeowners that can help reduce the possibility of mailbox damage from routine winter plowing operations.

• Place a 6- to 8-inch piece of reflective tape on the mailbox to help snow plow operators see the mailbox at night.

• Remove snow from around the mailbox, but avoid throwing the snow back onto the roadway.

• Homeowners may want to consider relocating the mailbox if it is located within the legal right of way and damage has been experienced in the past.

Homeowners may want to consider installing a cantilevered mailbox support that will swing a mailbox out of harm’s way. Plans for building the cantilevered “snow plow-friendly” mailbox can be obtained from any PennDOT County Maintenance Office in District 2 or by contacting the District Press Officer at (814) 765-0423. PennDOT District 2 includes the following counties: Cameron, Centre, Clearfield, Clinton, Elk, Juniata, McKean, Mifflin and Potter.
Making sure your mailbox is “snow plow-friendly” by ensuring its visibility and stability will help PennDOT and your local letter carrier deliver their best through the remainder of winter.



8 comments :

Anonymous said...

Very useful information.

BUT ... if you're mail carrier will go along with it and you're plow driver doesn't have a vengeance against you.

Anonymous said...

We could put ours as deep and as wide as The Great Wall of China and our snowplow driver would still run it over. We have ours plowed down a minimum of 3 x's each winter. We head out to work and voila! our mailbox is gone and laying several feet up the road in the ditch shattered in pieces. Neighbors found our credit card bill one spring in their yard and brought it to us.

Anonymous said...

Wonder how many thousands of dollars that drawing cost?

Anonymous said...

Mine was whipped out just 2 days ago and the plow truck just kept going! Gives you "usefull" tips but wth happens when they plow ur mailbox down?? NOTHING! They aren't responsible...Jerks anyways...

Anonymous said...

The State crew from Keating Summit, that services Southern Potter, are really good at not hitting mailboxes. Of course accidents happen from time to time, although that crew the incidents are few and far between.

Anonymous said...

I can remember my grandfather making something very similar back in the 60's, except it would swing at the base. The mail box would get nocked down all the time. Not from snow but the plow.
It got hit a few times and just swung away with just some dents.
Once the fun of knocking it down was taken away it never got touched again....lol.

Anonymous said...

mine has been taken out twice this year in genesee
wtf !!!!!

Anonymous said...

I fail to see how it can just swing away when the pipe is all the same size. to work effectively the main pole should be going into a pipe a bit larger in order to "swing away". The diagram they show does not show how it can just swing away. It does give directions on how to make a mail box post that will bend al to heck as it is anchored into solid concrete. If you think the pipe is going to turn on those threads on the bottom collar, you better think again as that will rust tight after a few seasons of rain and snow not to mention road salt being splashed on it.