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Saturday, March 1, 2014

Utica Shale Holds Great Promise For Natural Gas Production

Shale Gas Is Already ‘Game-Changer’ In Pennsylvania
Potter County Today gaspipesSome eye-opening statistics on the enormity of shale gas production in Pennsylvania were presented during a webinar presented recently by educators Matt Henderson and Dave Yoxtheimer from Penn State Extension. Among participants were representatives of the Potter County Natural Gas Resource Center. Henderson said that in just four years, Pennsylvania has evolved from a net importer of gas, ranked 14th among all states in production, to a gas exporter.
Pennsylvania already produces four times as much gas as the state consumes and the gap is growing daily.

 The revolution is the result of rich gas deposits tapped in shale formations and accessed through horizontal drilling and hydrofracturing. Henderson (shown below) said that, entering 2014, there were 4,917 producing shale gas wells in Pennsylvania, with another 1,225 wells drilled and ready to produce when pipelines and other infrastructure are in place. 

Property owners have earned billions of dollars in royalties, he pointed out. Royalties paid out in Bradford County have totaled $564 million, followed in order by Susquehanna ($488M), Washington ($234M), Greene ($232M), Lycoming ($231M) and Tioga ($214M). Some of the wells drilled into Marcellus Shale formations roughly 7,000 feet deep in Susquehanna County are gushers, Henderson pointed out. Chesapeake remains the most active gas company in Pennsylvania, but second-ranked Cabot — which is concentrated largely in Susquehanna County — owns 14 of the top 15 producing individual wells in the state. Rounding out the top six are Range, EQT, Anandarko and Talisman.

matthendersonAnd it’s not just the Marcellus Shale that holds gas, Henderson noted. At least four other shale “plays” at varying depth have been confirmed to be productive. One layer, the Utica Shale, is being tapped in Beaver, Butler and Lawrence counties.  

Most recently, Royal Dutch Shell tapped a Utica Shale well in Tioga County that has a initial yield more than three times the state’s most productive Marcellus Shale well, Henderson said.

Yoxtheimer concentrated on trends in disposal of contaminated water, sand, mud, cuttings and other waste generated at each shale gas well. About 87 percent of the water is being recycled — 71 percent of that total in the field and the other 29 percent in centralized recycling facilities. The webinar is now archived on the Penn State Extension natural gas website,  http://extension.psu.edu/natural-resources/natural-gas/webinars. Upcoming Penn State Marcellus Education Team webinars include the following:

  • March 27: “Land and Property Valuations with Shale Development,” featuring Jeffrey Kern, senior appraiser for Resource Technologies Corp.
  • April 17: “Pennsylvania Royalty Calculations and Decline Curves,” featuring Jim Ladlee, associate director of the Penn State Marcellus Center and director of special initiatives for the Penn State Shale Training and Education Center.
  • May 15: “World Oil and Gas Resources, Consumption, and New Trends, According to U.S. EIA,” presented by Aloulou Fawzi, industry economist and project manager of the exploration and production team with the Energy Information Administration at the U.S. Department of Energy.
Previous webinars, publications and information also are available on the Penn State Extension natural-gas website covering a variety of topics, such as oil and gas best practices; Act 13 (Pennsylvania’s oil and gas law); the volume of gas in shale formations under Pennsylvania; seismic testing; air pollution from gas development; water use and quality; natural gas liquids regional development; royalties; gas-leasing considerations for landowners; gas pipelines and right-of-way issues; legal issues surrounding gas development; the impact of Marcellus gas development on forestland; gas pipelines and pipeline project trends; and the reclamation of cuttings from the drilling of Marcellus Shale natural gas wells.

5 comments :

Anonymous said...

HEYYY!!!!! then why it cost so tootin much?? for us PA peeps

Anonymous said...

Pennsylvania's already had frack quakes. Our water, air & soil is polluted with chemicals and Radioactive pollution. Frackings also causing sinkholes. Fracking trucks are tearing up our roads. WE taxpayers must pay to clean up the mess that the environment destroying frackers, make. Renewable energy sources such as solar must be implemented before all of Pennsylvania is uninhabitiable.

Anonymous said...

100% AGREED!!!!!!

Pennsylvania's already had frack quakes. Our water, air & soil is polluted with chemicals and Radioactive pollution. Frackings also causing sinkholes. Fracking trucks are tearing up our roads. WE taxpayers must pay to clean up the mess that the environment destroying frackers, make. Renewable energy sources such as solar must be implemented before all of Pennsylvania is uninhabitiable.

Anonymous said...

Who isn't doing their homework? The percentage of material available researching the source of pollution in PA's streams DOES NOT point to shale development. That we must be mindful of our environment is a "given", but to slam a single industry for pollution of air and water ... get real. Spend a week marching behind a cow herd, then fertilize the fields before spring planting. PHEW! Still we'll be eating beef and enjoying dairy products, and darn thankful for them!
If Pennsylvanians are also enjoying the use of electricity and warmth in their homes, then just encourage responsible leasing and drilling.
There will come a time when renewables will take a more prominent place on the energy stage, but it's not now.

anti-everything? said...

Whose water air and soil is polluted? When a well(s) are drilled, how long are they there? Count the number of smoke spewing diesel trucks that travers I-80 everyday! Not bashing the trucking industry because we definitely need it. There are FAR more trucks running throughout our state everyday. There are at maximum 15 Large engines running on a frac pad at any one time and this is only during the frac process itself! How many PENNDOT trucks are out at any one time plowing the roads? (you know, the same roads you are &$(&^% about that aren't plowed properly) The drilling industry is also converting their drill rigs and associated equipment over to nat. gas engines to FURTHER reduce their "carbon footprint". You are using solar energy to heat and electrify your house I assume? As 11:56 pointed out with beef, You are vegan, I assume! All vegetables grown w/o conventional fertilizers? Your electric car is powered solely by solar or wind produced energy, I hope! If not, YOU also are partly to blame for our water, air and soil being polluted. THINK!! That's all just THINK!! Don't just jump on all of the "anti" bandwagons to feel better about yourself until you actually walk the walk!