Pennsylvania Lumber Museum Fall Antique & Collectible Show

Pennsylvania Lumber Museum Fall Antique & Collectible Show

Stoltz of Coudersport

xxx

xxx

Do You Know: You can buy this marquee ad on Solomon's words for the wise for your business or event for only $10. per day! It's just one of the low cost advertising options available. Your ad is viewed 40,000 to 70,000 times every day. Email us for information on other ad locations.

Street Machines

Solomon's Auction & Yard Sale Page

Bokman of Wellsville

Howard's Inc, Coudersport, PA

UPMC Cole

Friday, October 12, 2018

Headline Harrisburg by Rep. Matt Gabler



Facebook Website Bio Latest News State Forms Photo Gallery Contact
 

Headline Harrisburg
Thursday, October 11, 2018
The latest news from the State Capitol 

Giving Students Flexibility for Graduation Requirements

As a way to ensure students get the most out of their educational experience, the House passed legislation this week that would remove the heavy focus on standardized testing as a requirement to graduate and instead allow students various options to show proficiency in pursuing their own career paths.

Senate Bill 1095 would provide Pennsylvania students with additional options to fulfill high school graduation requirements beyond the Keystone Exams. Students who do not score proficient on the Keystone Exams would be able to demonstrate their readiness to graduate through alternative routes.

Specifically, the bill outlines several commonsense options for assessing student performance while also giving teachers more flexibility with classroom instruction time. Some alternatives include a student’s successful completion of work-based learning programs, a service learning project, or an offer of full-time employment as evidence of post-secondary readiness.

As part of the bill, the Keystone Exam graduation requirement would be put on hold until the 2021-22 school year. The alternate graduation options in Senate Bill 1095 would take effect when that delay expires.

This legislation, which now goes back to the Senate, seeks to enhance a multi-bill package to expand career and technical education to benefit both students and employers looking to fill jobs in high-demand fields.
 

Congratulations….


….to the North Point Volunteer Fire Company of DuBois and the Johnsonburg Fire Department.

Both companies are receiving grants through the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service as part of the effort to help rural community volunteer fire companies guard against the threat of wildfires in the state’s forests and other undeveloped areas.

The money may be used for purchasing mobile or portable radios; installing water supply equipment; wildfire prevention and mitigation work; training wildfire fighters; or converting and maintaining federal excess vehicles.
 

Attention Veterans


The 2nd-annual Veterans’ Expo and Career Fair will be held this Tuesday, Oct. 16, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in Expo Building One of the Clearfield County Fairgrounds.

The event will include employers and local businesses, colleges and universities, VA healthcare and benefits representatives. All veterans should bring their resumes and DD214s.

Flu shots will also be available from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., with a valid VA identification card or DD214.
 

Bringing State Government to You


On Friday, Oct. 19, the Cabinet in Your Community program will come to the Cobblestone Inn and Suites Conference Center, 328 Depot St., St. Marys.

From 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. that day, you will have the opportunity to ask questions of Department of Community and Economic Development Secretary Dennis Davin, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Secretary Cindy Dunn, Department of Environmental Protection Secretary Patrick McDonnell and Department of Agriculture Secretary Russell Redding.

No registration is necessary.
   

On the Road Again


Repairs to the Route 322/Woodland Road bridge in Bradford Township will begin this Monday, Oct. 15.

Work to be performed at this site includes drainage improvements, guiderail installation and concrete repairs to the arch culvert.

Most of the activity will take place off the roadway and will not impact traffic; however, there will be instances where flaggers in the roadway will enforce an alternating traffic pattern.
  

 
New Law Enhances Training, Oversight of Humane Officers

To help ensure the state’s animal cruelty laws are enforced in the fairest way possible, legislation has been signed into law to strengthen the training and oversight of Humane Society police officers.

Act 77 of 2018 increased initial and annual training hours for Humane Society police officers, and requires the training to include the proper procedure to file citations and warrants, including when and how to contact other law enforcement.

Other provisions of the new law require training in farm operations and biosecurity, including at least one on-site visit to a working commercial farm operation. Any organization that employs Humane Society police officers will be subject to the state’s Right-to-Know Law.

Additionally, a Humane Society police officer must be a resident of Pennsylvania. If the appointment of a Humane Society police officer is revoked in one county, it would be revoked in all counties.
 

 
House Passes Bill to Crack Down on Hazing

Legislation that seeks to better ensure the safety of students on college campuses by cracking down on hazing passed the House this week.

Senate Bill 1090 is a comprehensive overhaul of the state’s anti-hazing law to give law enforcement better tools to prosecute hazing-related activities and to encourage those nearby to call for assistance for someone who may need help.

Specifically, the bill would increase penalties for those involved in hazing; require schools to have policies and reporting procedures in place to stop hazing; and ensure that parents and students are provided with information related to the issue. The legislation also would establish clear parameters on hazing for organizations such as fraternities and sororities.

The legislation is named in memory of Tim Piazza, a Penn State student who died as a result of hazing in 2017 and was denied medical care for hours. The measure now heads back to the Senate for concurrence.
 

PennDOT Wants to Hear From You

PennDOT has a new and easier way for you to report concerns on state-maintained roadways.

Please click here for the details.
 

1 comment :

Anonymous said...

Hazing.. Some of the best Memory I have are being Hazed and Laughing while it all was going on.. I'm glad I was one to experience it and not cry about it.. Now the new generation are sissy's and cry when someone laughs at them.. The Hole game with the finger and the circle.. seriously get over yourselves..