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Saturday, May 5, 2018

One of the Candidates Running For 12th District Congressman In Democratic Primary

Shinglehouse Ambulance To Honeoye Haven

At 10:52 on Saturday, Shinglehouse Ambulance has been dispatched to Honeoye haven for a link to life call.

The winners are...

Ok...I know you have all been waiting and of course I have been tormenting...making you wait...so here we go...

The winning tickets for the $500 Shop N Save gift certificate and Costa's Food Center gift certificate are as follows:

Ticket #1 - Cindy Gaberseck of Coudersport chose the Shop N Save gift certificate

Ticket #2 - Doug Williams of Port Allegany won the Costa's Food Center gift certificate.

A big Thank You to everyone that bought tickets and showed their support for the Backpack program

To Fill A Backpack
81 Burleson Avenue
Roulette, PA 16746
Phone: (814) 544-2612
Email: info@tofillabackpack.org
Website: www.tofillabackpack.org

FINAL HUNTING AND TRAPPING SEASONS APPROVED

FINAL HUNTING AND TRAPPING SEASONS APPROVED

Commissioners allocate 838,000 antlerless licenses for 2018-19.

The Pennsylvania Board of Game Commissioners today gave final approval to hunting and trapping seasons and bag limits for the 2018-19 license year.

A list of all seasons and bag limits appears at the end of this news release.

The commissioners also set the number of antlerless deer licenses to be allocated, as well as the number of elk licenses to be allocated for the coming license year.

The board voted to allocate 838,000 antlerless deer licenses statewide, which is up from the 804,000 licenses allocated for 2017-18. Allocations by Wildlife Management Unit (WMU) are as follows, with the allocation from the previous license year appearing in parentheses: WMU 1A – 48,000 (52,000); WMU 1B – 37,000 (35,000); WMU 2A – 49,000 (50,000); WMU 2B – 58,000 (60,000); WMU 2C – 44,000 (31,000); WMU 2D – 63,000 (55,000); WMU 2E – 27,000 (22,000); WMU 2F – 23,000 (24,000); WMU 2G – 30,000 (25,500); WMU 2H – 6,000 (7,000); WMU 3A – 22,000 (20,000); WMU 3B – 29,000 (30,000); WMU 3C – 38,000 (42,000); WMU 3D – 25,000 (25,000); WMU 4A – 38,000 (30,000); WMU 4B – 26,000 (26,000); WMU 4C – 30,000 (29,000); WMU 4D – 34,000 (34,000); WMU 4E – 32,000 (27,500); WMU 5A – 23,000 (22,000); WMU 5B – 58,000 (57,000); WMU 5C – 70,000 (70,000); and WMU 5D – 28,000 (30,000).

Hunting licenses for 2018-19 go on sale in mid-June and become effective July 1. After hunters purchase a general hunting license, they may apply for antlerless deer licenses based on staggered timelines, which will be outlined in the 2018-19 Pennsylvania Hunting & Trapping Digest to be made available online.

The board also voted to issue 125 elk licenses (26 antlered, 99 antlerless) for the 2018 hunt.

The licenses again will be awarded by lottery, and the deadline to enter the drawing is July 31.

Elk applications cost $10.90, and only one application may be submitted each license year.

Other modifications approved for the 2018-19 seasons include: extending the statewide archery deer season to Monday, Nov. 12 to include the Veterans Day holiday; eliminating the hen pheasant restriction in WMUs 2A, 2C, 4C, and 5B; implementing a new four-day extended black bear firearms season in WMUs 4A and 5A; increasing from four days to six days the length of the extended black bear firearms season in WMU 3A; extending hunting hours for mourning doves from one-half hour before sunrise until sunset in all season segments; and opening WMUs 4B and 4C to fisher trapping.

Several highlights pertaining to the 2018-19 seasons follow.



SPLIT FIREARMS DEER SEASONS ADOPTED
The Board of Game Commissioners adopted a slate of deer seasons for 2018-19, implementing a split, five-day antlered deer season (Nov. 26-Nov. 30) and seven-day concurrent season (Dec. 1-8) in 20 Wildlife Management Units. The list includes WMUs 1A, 1B, 2A, 2C, 2D, 2E, 2F, 2G, 2H, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D, 4A, 4B, 4C, 4D, 4E, 5A and 5B. The package also retains the two-week (Nov. 26-Dec. 8) concurrent, antlered and antlerless deer season in WMUs 2B, 5C and 5D.

Hunters with Deer Management Assistance Program (DMAP) antlerless deer permits may use the permits on the lands for which they were issued during any established deer season, and will continue to be permitted to harvest antlerless deer from Nov. 26-Dec. 8 in 1A, 1B, 2A, 2C, 2D, 2E, 2F, 2G, 2H, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D, 4A, 4B, 4C, 4D, 4E, 5A and 5B. Fees for DMAP permits are $10.90 for residents and $35.90 for nonresidents.

DMAP permits also may be transferred to Mentored Hunting Program participants.
The board has retained antler restrictions for adult and senior license holders since the 2011-12 seasons. It remains the “three-up” on one side, not counting a brow tine, provision for the western Wildlife Management Units of 1A, 1B, 2A, 2B and 2D, and the three points on one side in all other WMUs. Those exempt from these antler restrictions are mentored youth hunters, junior license holders, disabled hunters with a permit to use a vehicle as a blind and resident active-duty military on leave.

Once again this year, the commissioners gave final approval to concurrent hunting of antlered and antlerless deer in WMUs 2B, 5C and 5D during most seasons, with the first segment of the archery season to run from Sept. 15 to Nov. 24 in those WMUs.



2018 ELK HUNT BY THE NUMBERS
In total, 125 elk licenses – 26 antlered, 99 antlerless – have been allocated for 2018-19.

Licenses are available in a new Elk Hunt Zone, EHZ 14, which is comprised of 86-percent public land including Kettle Creek State Park. Six tags are allocated within EHZ 14.

EHZ 7 again will receive no license allocation in 2018-19. This zone covers a few square miles around the Elk Country Visitor Center and the Game Commission’s viewing areas.

The elk license allocations by hunt zone follow: EHZ 1, no tags, but it is open to all hunters; EHZ 2, 27 tags (2 antlered); EHZ 3, 7 tags (2 antlered); EHZ 4, 7 tags (2 antlered); EHZ 5, 6 tags (3 antlered); EHZ 6, 9 tags (2 antlered); EHZ 7, 0 tags; EHZ 8, 9 tags (2 antlered); EHZ 10, 13 tags (2 antlered); EHZ 11, 4 tags (2 antlered); EHZ 12, 20 tags (3 antlered); EHZ 13, 8 tags (2 antlered); and EHZ 14, 6 tags (2 antlered).

FALL TURKEY SEASON CHANGES APPROVED
The Pennsylvania Board of Game Commissioners today gave final approval to fall turkey seasons for 2018 and spring gobbler seasons for 2019.

The board for the second consecutive year approved a conservative, midweek fall turkey season in Wildlife Management Unit 5B.

All recommendations on fall turkey season length are made in accordance with guidelines in the Game Commission’s Wild Turkey Management Plan.

The fall season in WMUs 1A, 2A, 4A and 4B will be one week (Oct. 27-Nov. 3), plus a three-day Thanksgiving season (Nov. 22-24).

In WMU 1B, the season will remain one week (Oct. 27-Nov. 3), with no Thanksgiving season.

In WMU 2B (shotgun and bow only), the season will run from Oct. 27-Nov. 16 and Nov. 22-24.

In WMU 2C, the season will be Oct. 27-Nov. 16 and Nov. 22-24.

In WMUs 2D, 2E, 2F, 2G, 2H, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D, 4C, 4D and 4E, the season will be Oct. 27-Nov. 10 and Nov. 22-24.

In WMU 5A, the season will be from Nov. 1-3.

In WMU 5B, the season will be from Oct. 30-Nov. 1.

And in WMUs 5C and 5D, the season will remain closed for the fall seasons.

For the 2019 spring gobbler season, which will run from April 27-May 31, the board continued with legal hunting hours to reflect the following: from April 27-May 11, legal shooting hours will be one-half hour before sunrise until noon; and from May 13-31, hunters may hunt all day, from one-half hour before sunrise until one-half hour after sunset.

The board approved holding the one-day Spring Gobbler Youth Hunt on April 20, 2019, which will run from one-half hour before sunrise until noon. All junior license holders and Mentored Youth Hunting Program permit holders can participate in this special half-day hunt, as well as the other spring season dates.


2018-19 HUNTING SEASONS AND BAG LIMITS

SQUIRRELS, Red, Gray, Black and Fox (Combined): Special season for eligible junior hunters, with or without required license, and mentored youth – Sept. 29-Oct. 13 (6 daily, 18 in possession limit after first day).

SQUIRRELS, Red, Gray, Black and Fox (Combined): Oct. 13-Nov. 24; Dec. 10-24 and Dec. 26-Feb. 28 (6 daily, 18 possession).

RUFFED GROUSE: Oct. 13–Nov. 24 and Dec. 10-24 (2 daily, 6 possession).

RABBIT (Cottontail) Special season for eligible junior hunters, with or without required license: Sept. 29-Oct. 13 (4 daily, 12 possession).

RABBIT (Cottontail): Oct. 13-Nov. 24, Dec. 10-24 and Dec. 26-Feb. 28 (4 daily, 12 possession).

PHEASANT: Special season for eligible junior hunters, with or without required license – Oct. 6-13 (2 daily, 6 in possession). Male pheasants only in WMUs 4E and 5A. Male and female pheasants may be taken in all other WMUs. There is no open season for taking pheasants in Wild Pheasant Recovery Areas, except within the Central Susquehanna Wild Pheasant Recovery Area, as authorized by executive order.

PHEASANT: Oct. 20-Nov. 24, Dec. 10-24 and Dec. 26-Feb. 28 (2 daily, 6 in possession). Male pheasants only in WMUs 4E and 5A. Male and female pheasants may be taken in all other WMUs There is no open season for taking pheasants in Wild Pheasant Recovery Areas, except within the Central Susquehanna Wild Pheasant Recovery Area, as authorized by executive order.

BOBWHITE QUAIL: Oct. 13-Nov. 24, Dec. 10-24 and Dec. 26-Feb. 28 (8 daily, 24 possession).

HARES (SNOWSHOE RABBITS) OR VARYING HARES: Dec. 26–Jan. 1, in all WMUs (1 daily, 3 possession).

WOODCHUCKS (GROUNDHOGS): No closed season, except on Sundays and during the regular firearms deer seasons. No limit.

CROWS: July 1-April 14, on Friday, Saturday and Sunday only. No limit.

STARLINGS AND ENGLISH SPARROWS: No closed season, except during the antlered and antlerless deer season. No limit.

WILD TURKEY (Male or Female): WMU 1B – Oct. 27-Nov. 3; WMU 2B (Shotgun and bow and arrow) – Oct. 27-Nov. 16 and Nov. 22-24; WMUs 1A, 2A, 4A and 4B, – Oct. 27-Nov. 3 and Nov. 22-24; WMUs 2D, 2E, 2F, 2G, 2H, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D, 4C, 4D and 4E– Oct. 27-Nov. 10 and Nov. 22-24; WMU 2C – Oct. 27-Nov. 16 and Nov. 22-24; WMU 5A – Nov. 1-3; WMU 5B – Oct. 30-Nov. 1; WMUs 5C and 5D – CLOSED TO FALL TURKEY HUNTING.

SPRING GOBBLER (Bearded bird only): Special season for eligible junior hunters, with required license, and mentored youth – April 20, 2019. Only 1 spring gobbler may be taken during this hunt.

SPRING GOBBLER (Bearded bird only): April 27-May 31, 2019. Daily limit 1, season limit 2. (Second spring gobbler may be only taken by persons who possess a valid special wild turkey license.) From April 27-May 11, legal hunting hours are one-half hour before sunrise until noon; from May 13-31, legal hunting hours are one-half hour before sunrise until one-half hour after sunset.

BLACK BEAR (Statewide) Archery: Oct. 29-Nov. 3. Only 1 bear may be taken during the license year.

BLACK BEAR (Statewide): Nov. 17-21. Only 1 bear may be taken during the license year.

BLACK BEAR (WMUs 3A, 3B, 3C and 3D): Nov. 26-Dec. 1. Only 1 bear may be taken during the license year.

BLACK BEAR (WMUs 2B, 5B, 5C and 5D): Nov. 26-Dec. 8. Only 1 bear may be taken during the license year.

BLACK BEAR (WMUs 1B, 2C, 4A, 4B, 4C, 4D, 4E and 5A): Nov. 28-Dec. 1. Only 1 bear may be taken during the license year.

BLACK BEAR (WMUs 2B, 5C and 5D) archery: Sept. 15-Nov. 24. Only 1 bear may be taken during the license year.

BLACK BEAR (WMU 5B) archery: Sept. 29-Nov. 10. Only 1 bear may be taken during the license year.

BLACK BEAR (WMUs 2B, 5B, 5C and 5D) muzzleloader: Oct. 13-20. Only 1 bear may be taken during the license year.

BLACK BEAR (WMUs 2B, 5B, 5C and 5D) special firearms: Oct. 18-20, for junior and senior license holders, disabled hunters with a permit to use a vehicle as a blind and resident active duty military.

ELK (Antlered or Antlerless): Nov. 5-10. Only one elk may be taken during the license year.

ELK, EXTENDED (Antlered and Antlerless): Nov. 12-17. Only one elk may be taken during the license year. Eligible elk license recipients who haven’t harvested an elk by Nov. 10, in designated areas.

DEER, ARCHERY (Antlered and Antlerless) WMUs 2B, 5C and 5D: Sept. 15- Nov. 24 and Dec. 26-Jan. 26, 2019. One antlerless deer with each required antlerless license. One antlered deer per hunting license year.

DEER, ARCHERY (Antlered and Antlerless) Statewide: Sept. 29-Nov. 12 and Dec. 26-Jan. 12. One antlered deer per hunting license year. One antlerless deer with each required antlerless license.

DEER (Antlered and Antlerless) WMUs 2B, 5C and 5D: Nov. 26-Dec. 8. One antlered deer per hunting license year. An antlerless deer with each required antlerless license.

DEER (Antlered Only) WMUs 1A, 1B, 2A, 2C, 2D, 2E, 2F, 2G, 2H, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D, 4A, 4B, 4C, 4D, 4E, 5A and 5B: Nov. 26-30. One antlered deer per hunting license year. (Holders of valid DMAP antlerless deer permits may harvest antlerless deer on DMAP properties during this period.)

DEER (Antlered and Antlerless) WMUs 1A, 1B, 2A, 2C, 2D, 2E, 2F, 2G, 2H, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D, 4A, 4B, 4C, 4D, 4E, 5A and 5B: Dec. 1-8. One antlered deer per hunting license year. An antlerless deer with each required antlerless license.

DEER, ANTLERLESS SPECIAL FIREARMS (Statewide): Oct. 18-20. Junior and Senior License Holders, Mentored Youth Permit Holders, Disabled Person Permit (to use a vehicle) Holders, and Pennsylvania residents serving on active duty in U.S. Armed Services or in the U.S. Coast Guard only, with required antlerless license. Also included are persons who have reached or will reach their 65th birthday in the year of the application for a license and hold a valid adult license, or qualify for license and fee exemptions under section 2706. One antlerless deer with each required antlerless license.

DEER, ANTLERLESS MUZZLELOADER (Statewide): Oct. 13-20. An antlerless deer with each required antlerless license.

DEER, ANTLERED OR ANTLERLESS FLINTLOCK (Statewide): Dec. 26-Jan. 12. One antlered deer per hunting license year, or one antlerless deer and an additional antlerless deer with each required antlerless license.

DEER, ANTLERED OR ANTLERLESS FLINTLOCK (WMUs 2B, 5C, 5D): Dec. 26-Jan. 26. One antlered deer per hunting license year, or one antlerless deer and an additional antlerless deer with each required antlerless license.

DEER, ANTLERLESS EXTENDED REGULAR FIREARMS: (Allegheny, Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery and Philadelphia counties): Dec. 26-Jan. 26. An antlerless deer with each required antlerless license.

DEER, ANTLERLESS (Military Bases): Hunting permitted on days established by the U.S. Department of the Army at Letterkenny Army Depot, Franklin County; New Cumberland Army Depot, York County; and Fort Detrick, Raven Rock Site, Adams County. An antlerless deer with each required antlerless license.

2018-19 FURBEARER HUNTING SEASONS

COYOTES: No closed season. Unlimited. Outside of any big game season (deer, bear, elk and turkey), coyotes may be taken with a hunting license or a furtaker license, and without wearing orange. During any big game season, coyotes may be taken while lawfully hunting big game or with a furtaker license.

RACCOONS and FOXES: Oct. 20-Feb. 16, unlimited.

OPOSSUM, STRIPED SKUNKS and WEASELS: No closed season, except Sundays. No limits.

BOBCAT (WMUs 2A, 2C, 2E, 2F, 2G, 2H, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D, 4A, 4C, 4D and 4E): Jan. 12-Feb. 6. One bobcat per license year. Licensed furtakers may obtain one permit each.

PORCUPINES: Sept. 1-March 30, 2019. (3 daily, season limit of 10).

2018-19 TRAPPING SEASONS

MINKS and MUSKRATS: Nov. 17-Jan. 6. Unlimited.

COYOTES, FOXES, OPOSSUMS, RACCOONS, STRIPED SKUNKS and WEASELS: Oct. 21–Feb. 17. No limit.

COYOTES and FOXES (Statewide) Cable Restraints: Dec. 26-Feb. 17. No limit. Participants must pass cable restraint certification course.

BEAVERS (Statewide): Dec. 26-March 31 (Limits vary depending on WMU).

BOBCATS (WMUs 2A, 2C, 2E, 2F, 2G, 2H, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D, 4A, 4C, 4D and 4E): Dec. 15-Jan. 6.

One bobcat per license year. Licensed furtakers may obtain one permit each.

FISHERS (WMUs 1B, 2C, 2D, 2E, 2F, 2G, 2H, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D, 4B, 4C, 4D and 4E): Dec. 15-26. One fisher per license year. Licensed furtakers may obtain one permit each.

RIVER OTTERS (WMUs 3C and 3D): Feb. 16-23, 2019. One river otter per license year. Licensed furtakers may obtain one permit each.

2018-19 FALCONRY SEASONS

SQUIRRELS (combined) Sept. 1-March 30, 2019 (6 daily, 18 possession)

BOBWHITE QUAIL Sept. 1-March 30, 2019 (8 daily, 24 possession)

RUFFED GROUSE Sept. 1-March 30, 2019 (2 daily, 6 possession)

COTTONTAIL RABBITS Sept. 1-March 30, 2019 (4 daily, 12 possession)

SNOWSHOE OR VARYING HARES Sept. 1-March 30, 2019 (1 daily, 3 possession)

RINGNECK PHEASANTS (Male or Female combined): Sept. 1-March 30, 2019 (6 daily, 18 possession)

No open season on other wild birds or mammals.

Waterfowl and Migratory Game Bird seasons to be established in accordance with federal regulations at a later date.

Simplicity Packages From Thomas E. Fickinger Funeral Home In Coudersport, PA


Castaway Charters Now Booking Lake Erie Day Fishing Trips For June Thru September

A few May night trips are still available!!

Recalls For May 5th

Eddy Packing Co., Inc. Recalls Smoked Sausage Products Due to Possible Foreign Matter Contamination

Eddy Packing Co., Inc., a Yoakum, Texas establishment, is recalling approximately 49,558 pounds of smoked sausage products that may be contaminated with foreign matter, specifically hard plastic.

Potter County Senior Center Volunteers Honored

More than 170 volunteers were honored at the four Potter County
Senior Centers in April. Volunteers deliver meals to the homebound, help at
the senior centers, assist with income tax and property tax/rent rebates,
teach computer classes, lead exercise classes, plan Health & Wellness
Programs and etc. Aging Advisory Council members were honored at their May
meeting.

Ulysses Senior Center Volunteers were entertained with music by Bill Moon.
Northern Potter High School Students served the meal and helped with the
cleanup.

Coudersport Senior Center Volunteers were entertained with music by Harold
Kiel. Coudersport High School students served the meal and helped with the
cleanup. Suzan Paisley, from Rep. Martin Causer's office gave some
encouraging words.

Oswayo Valley Senior Centers Volunteers walked down the Yellow Brick Road to
Emerald City. The center was decorated and brought to life the movie, "The
Wizard of Oz". Oswayo High School students helped with the event, as well
as serve the meal and help with the cleanup. Dr. Michele Hartzell,
Superintendent of Oswayo Valley schools gave some encouraging words to the
volunteers.

Galeton Senior Center Volunteers enjoyed the "Rays of Sunshine" theme at
their center. Galeton High School Students helped serve the meal and helped
with the cleanup. The highlight of the day was the senior citizens and
students dancing to many of their favorite tunes. It was a great display of
"Intergenerational Fun".

Coudersport man's truck vandalized by permenant marker


PSP Emporium trying to locate the owner of a pair of glasses that were found


Front tire falls off vehicle and causes accident on Rt. 120


PSP Emporium investigating a hit and run


Man charged for drugs after a search of his vehicle


Reinard receives Educator of the Year Award

DuBOIS – Barbara Reinard, assistant teaching professor in the Penn State DuBois Physical Therapy Assistant (PTA) program has been named the DuBois Educational Foundation (DEF) Educator of the Year. She was presented with her award by DEF president Craig Ball during commencement ceremonies at Penn State DuBois on Friday evening.

The Educator of the Year Award is given annually by the DEF to recognize outstanding teaching. All nominees must be full-time faculty members with at least one year of prior service at Penn State DuBois. This honor is based purely on student feedback, as the students submit nominations and the award winner is chosen based on the number and quality of nominations received.

Student nominations praised Reinard with statements such as, "During all of Dr. Reinard's lectures, she always had this positive energy and presented things with such passion that it made you want to learn. During class, you can tell how much the physical therapy field means to her. She truly wants each student that sits in her class to share that same enthusiasm for physical therapy that she has. It makes learning fun, and you look forward to going to her class to see what new material she has for next time."

Another student's nominations said, "Barb is more than deserving of this award as she has dedicated so much of her time in developing the PTA program. She will go above and beyond to make sure her students understand the course content and can be successful."

Reinard began teaching at Penn State DuBois in 1997. She is also the staff physical therapist and assistant director of Physical/Occupational Therapy at Indiana Hospital where she has worked since 1988. She has served as clinical instructor at the hospital for six years, and as the center coordinator for Clinical Education for five years.

Reinard earned a bachelor's degree in Biology from Clarion University in 1985, and a bachelor's in Physical Therapy from the University of Pittsburgh in 1988. She went on to complete her master's in Adult and Community Education at Indiana University of Pennsylvania in 1997. She recently earned a Ph.D. in Physical Therapy from Shenandoah University.


DEF President Craig Ball presents Assistant Teaching Professor Barbara Reinard with the DEF Educator of the Year Award.

Blossburg woman found to be DUI while investigating her accident


Lorraine M. Baka, age 70, of West Fourth Street, Emporium, PA

LORRAINE M. BAKA

Lorraine M. Baka, age 70, of West Fourth Street, Emporium, PA, died Thursday, May 3, 2018, in her home.

Born August 26, 1947 in St. Marys, she was the daughter of the late Herman and Margaret Cessna Johnson. On April 12, 1972 in Emporium she married Boyd Baka who died March 3, 1993.

A 1965 graduate of Cameron County High School, Lorraine was employed by the Cabin Kitchen Restaurant while she was still in school. From 1971 until 2007 she was resident of Austin, Pa where she was employed by Emporium Specialties from 1971 until 1987. She had also been employed by Schumacher's, Galeotti's Restaurant, and The Cockeyed Cricket in Austin.
She later returned to Emporium where she was employed by JSH Enterprises until retiring in 2007.

Mrs. Baka attended the First Presbyterian Church in Emporium.

Survivors include: two sons, Michael L. (Heather) Bauer of Emporium and Roger A. (Judy) Bauer of Coudersport; one brother, Leslie Johnson of Mifflinburg; five grandchildren, Sabrina M. Goss, Bryce M. Bauer, Megan M. Walck, Nicole R. Setzer and Dylan M. Setzer; five great grandchildren, Cullen, Colton, Rhiannon, Ridley and Addillyn; and one niece, Kristen and
one nephew, Carl.

A visitation will be held at the Coppersmith-Condon Funeral Home, Emporium on Monday, May 7, from 10 - 11 a.m. at which time Funeral Services will follow with the Rev. Lawrence Cessna, officiating.

Burial will be in Oakmont Cemetery, Ridgway.

Memorials, if desired, may be made to the Cameron County SPCA, 678 South
Mountain Road, Emporium, PA 15834.

Spring Commencement Celebrated at Penn State DuBois

DuBOIS – Nearly 80 members of the Penn State DuBois class of 2018 made the transition from students, to alumni on Friday evening at the campus spring commencement ceremonies. Chancellor M. Scott McBride presided over the ceremonies, with Professor Arshad Khan serving as faculty marshal. Special guest speaker Christine Beretsel provided the commencement address. Music for the ceremony was provided by the Penn State School of Music Graduate Brass Quintet. Academic achievement awards were presented to Tristan Smith, for associate degrees, and to Julia Test, for baccalaureate degrees.

A highly successful business woman who was able to take an early retirement from Fortune 500 pharmaceutical company Merck, Beretsel was able to offer the new graduates first-hand advice on achieving success in their careers during her address.

A campus alumna, and supporter of campus programs, Beretsel began her long relationship with Penn State DuBois as an undergraduate in 1986. She earned her bachelor's degree in accounting, and went on to complete an MBA from Villanova. She also completed the Certified Financial Planning program at the American College for Financial Services.

Beretsel worked for Merck for 29 years in finance, manufacturing, and information technology. She had the opportunity to support both U.S. and international operations, traveling to locations in Europe and Asia. She retired in 2015, and now teaches Personal Finance at DeSales University as an adjunct professor. She also volunteers her time as an AARP Tax Counselor during the tax season.

Beretsel has remembered where her journey started, becoming a steadfast supporter of Penn State DuBois. She is a member of the Greater Penn State Campaign Committee, a supporter of BEST Robotics at Penn State DuBois, and recently established an Open Doors Scholarship at the campus.

In her address, Beretsel told new graduates, "Build on what you know. You have achieved a degree from a nationally recognized university, which signifies a great deal of study, understanding and demonstrated knowledge. Use that, put it to work. Many of you have worked while you were in school, I know I did. Take that practical understanding that you’ve gained from real life experience, plus the technical knowledge that you obtained in the class room, and use it as a launching point; build on it. The retail job I had in high school gave me insight into the business world. While at Penn State, I worked in a bank, first here in DuBois, then later in State College, which exposed me to the finance world."

Beretsel also told graduates to tackle the hard things in life, head on. She said, "Don’t shy away from something that is hard, complex, messy or ambiguous. Those are the opportunities that provide the most growth, sense of accomplishment, and chance to make the biggest impact. I want you to think about the classes that you learned the most in. Were they the easy A classes that you breezed right through? Or was it Anatomy, Biology, Law, Statistics, or Effective Speech? Classes that you spent more time on that you thought possible just to get through. Don’t shy away from the hard or unknown, you’re missing a great opportunity to grow."

In her final point, Beretsel told those embarking on their careers that even though they've now earned their degree, they should never stop learning.

"If you’ve recovered from the exhaustion that comes with the last week of finals you should be pretty proud of yourself right now. You’ve achieved a huge goal, "Beretsel said. "Many of you have uttered, 'I’m finished with school, and I’ll never go back again.' Sorry my friends, that’s not the case. To be successful, education needs to be an integral part of your life. Your brain is like a muscle and it needs to be exercised. Never stop learning."

Beretsel explained that professionals can constantly evolve and continue to learn throughout their careers, building new skill on the job, or continuing with new trainings, degree programs, or certifications that will enrich their knowledge and better qualify them for future success.

"In closing, I would encourage you to build on your knowledge, look for opportunities in growth fields, even if that field isn’t well defined. Many of you have interest in healthcare, engineering, and sustaining our environment. I’m sure many of the business majors are budding entrepreneurs," Beretsel said. She concluded, "I’ve touched on what I’ve done in the last 30 years. I never imaged that I would get to travel around the world when I first stepped onto this campus. What do you image you’ll be doing in 30 years?"

Spring 2018 Penn State DuBois graduates are:


University College
Degree of Bachelor of Arts

Administration of Justice
Grace Earle Osceola, PA

Letters, Arts, and Sciences
Tory Anderson Curwensville, PA

University College
Degree of Bachelor of Science

Administration of Justice
Timothy Smith State College, PA

Business
Caleb Bennett Kersey, PA
Laura Breakey Brookville, PA
Roger Mikulec Falls Creek, PA
Marissa Pearce Falls Creek, PA
Jacob Perrin DuBois, PA
Austin Sabatucci Punxsutawney, PA
Rachel Schreiber Saint Marys, PA
Julie Shimmel (Cum Laude) Wallaceton, PA
Jacob Skubisz DuBois, PA
Julia Test (Summa Cum Laude) Curwensville, PA

Human Development and Family Studies
Kylee Barrett DuBois, PA
Daniel Bowman Ebensburg, PA
Tosha Hahn DuBois, PA
Krista Kolesar Curwensville, PA
Mckayla Meyer Saint Marys, PA
Austin Miller (Cum Laude) Rockton, PA
Brittany Renaud* Clearfield, PA
Alaina Shaffer* Clearfield, PA
Brooke Simcox Curwensville, PA
Andrew Smith* Hamilton, PA
Fayeanna Tarner Grassflat, PA
Kylee Turek DuBois, PA

Information Sciences and Technology
Alexander Chezosky DuBois, PA
Ryan Lingle Clearfield, PA
Brandon Pash Grassflat, PA
Ethan Wawrynovic (Magna Cum Laude) Philipsburg, PA

College of Engineering
Degree of Bachelor of Engineering

Engineering
Cory Jamieson (Magna Cum Laude) Punxsutawney, PA
Matthew Lingle DuBois, PA
Christian Muth Reynoldsville, PA

College of Health and Human Development
Degree of Bachelor of Science

Health Policy and Administration
Taylor Stott Clearfield, PA

University College
Degree of Associate in Science

Business Administration
Kendell Sherwood DuBois, PA

Information Sciences and Technology
Jacob Chileski (Summa Cum Laude) Saint Marys, PA
Kevin Decker Curwensville, PA
Matthew Jones Clearfield, PA
Ryan Kemerer Falls Creek, PA
Kameron Kemmer DuBois, PA
Jess Polohonki (Magna Cum Laude) Falls Creek, PA
Charles Seitz DuBois, PA

Occupational Therapy
Ashley Mangiantini Mayport, PA

Physical Therapist Assistant
Christa August Reynoldsville, PA
Hannah Eckert Saint Marys, PA
Logan Hutton (Magna Cum Laude) Irvona, PA
Derek Knittle Mahaffey, PA
Danielle Kocjancic (Cum Laude) Kane, PA
Zachary Kovacik (Cum Laude) Altoona, PA
Kelli Lingenfelter Reynoldsville, PA
Samantha Reinard Brookville, PA
Andrew Zilkofski Kane, PA
College of Agricultural Sciences
Degree of Associate in Science

Wildlife Technology
Hope Bridge Punxsutawney, PA
Logan Bubb Jersey Shore, PA
Zachary Byers James Creek, PA
Adam Chorba Dallas, PA
Cody Farmery Arcadia, PA
Jakob Felix DuBois, PA
Tyler Hilliard DuBois, PA
Cali Housler Emporium, PA
Daniel Jenkins Warren, PA
Carter Johnson Middletown, PA
Sean Lauer (Cum Laude) Felton, PA
Caleb Lorson* Williamsport, PA
Kory Mcconnell New Florence, PA
Lane Potts Indiana, PA
Aaron Reinard Brookville, PA
Darby Richard New Bloomfield, PA
Colin Rohrback Saint Marys, PA
Jacob Seifert Buffalo Mills, PA
Tristan Smith (Summa Cum Laude) DuBois, PA
Alexis Stine Dover, PA
Colton Treaster Rebersburg, PA

College of Engineering
Degree of Associate in Engineering Technology

Mechanical Engineering Technology
Brenda Greenthaner Kersey, PA
Chloe Hanes Saint Marys, PA
Cole Kriner DuBois, PA
Timothy Sutley (Magna Cum Laude) Cranberry, PA

Successful businesswoman, campus donor, and alumna Christina Beretsel urged students to build upon their knowledge and never stop learning throughout their careers during her commencement address on Friday evening.

No injuries in accident on Route 6


Edna Mae Church, 88, of Emerald Isle, Smethport, PA

Edna Mae Church

Edna Mae Church, 88, of Emerald Isle, Smethport, PA passed away Friday (May 4, 2018) in UPMC Cole, Coudersport.

Born August 11, 1929, in Smethport, she was a daughter of Edward L. and Naomi Taylor Covert. On Nov. 14, 1947, in Farmers Valley, PA, she married Glenn C. Church, who survives. They were married 70 years.

Edna was a longtime resident of the area and attended Hilltop Baptist Church, Gifford. Edna and her mom owned & operated Hap’s Kitchen in Gifford. She later baked pies for her daughter at Myra’s Restaurant in East Smethport. Mrs. Church shared the joy of music with her husband, Glenn, and also enjoyed playing music with Happy Ed & Jack.

Surviving are four daughters, Ethel L. (Wayne) Schmidt of Hazel Hurst, Myra E. (Keath) Smith of Smethport, Sandra K. (James) Lasher of Eldred, Cynthia D. (Robert) Bowen of Kuno, ID; 10 grandchildren, 11 great-grandchildren; a sister, Naomi P. (Orville) Toothman of Taft, CA; a sister-in-law, Donna Covert of Lewis Run; and several nieces and nephews.

She was preceded in death by her parents, Edward and Naomi Covert, a grandson, Keith V. Smith, and a brother, Edward L. Covert.

Friends will be received from 10:30 a.m. till noon Tuesday (May 8, 2018) at the Hilltop Baptist Church, Gifford, where a funeral service will be held at noon with Rev. Max Simms, pastor, and Rev. Ronald Vieselmeyer, co-officiating. Burial will be in Fairmount Cemetery, Smethport.
Memorials can be made to the Hilltop Baptist Church.
Funeral arrangements are under the direction of the Switzer Funeral Home, Port Allegany.

Condolences can be made to: Glenn C. Church
309 Emerald Isle
Smethport, PA 16749

Gary G. Baird, age 75, of 88 Mapleview Dr., Ridgway, PA

Gary G. Baird
Army Vet

Gary G. Baird, age 75, of 88 Mapleview Dr., Ridgway, PA died Wednesday May 2, 2018 at Pinecrest Manor following a lengthy illness. 

He was born May 23, 1942, in Middletown, PA, son of the late Earl J. and Elaine (Vovakes) Baird. He married Peggy J. Durnell, she survives. 

He resided in Ridgway for over 30 years and was a Protestant by faith. 

He served in the U.S. Army. He had been employed by Indian River Transport out of Winter Haven, FL as a truck driver for many years. 

He is survived by his wife Peggy J. Baird of Ridgway, 3 sons: Earl J. (Christy) Baird of North Carolina, Jeffery L. (Susan) Baird of Janesville, Wisconsin, and Jamie R. Baird of Ridgway, 7 grandchildren: Emmie, Colton, Noah, Sarah, Garret, Myah, and Benjamin, 2 sisters: Dolly and Marilyn, and 3 brothers: James, Randy, and Lonnie. 

He was preceded in death by his parents. There will be no visitation or funeral services. Memorials can be made to the donor’s choice. Funeral arrangements are under the direction of the Thompson Funeral Home.

Bradford Dispatched For Grill Fire On A Porch

At 4:340 PM on Saturday, Bradford Firefighters have been dispatched to East Main Street for a grill fire on a porch.
Report cooking hamburgers, no fire.

North Bingham Cemetery Association Meeting

North Bingham Cemetery Association will be holding a meeting. May 7, 2018 at 7 pm. at the township hall. All are welcome to attend.


Derrick City Dispatched To Gasoline Spill on Rt. 219

At 4:03 PM on Saturday, Derrick City Fire Department has been dispatched for a gasoline spill on Rt. 219, north of the Foster Brook Exit.

Judith C. Smith, 55, a loving wife, mother, and grammy, of Gifford, PA

Judith C. Smith

Judith C. Smith, 55, a loving wife, mother, and grammy, of Gifford, PA passed away Thursday, May 3, 2018.

Born October 1, 1962 in Bradford, she was a daughter of the late Harry "Hank" and Lois (Stilson) Coast. She was a 1981 graduate of Smethport High School.

On May 7, 1983 in Lewis Run, she married Douglas D. Smith who survives.

Judy started her banking career in 1984 at Hamlin Bank & Trust as a teller. She advanced to loan operations a position she held at the time of her death. In 2014 she and her husband opened Vavalo's Bar and Restaurant. She loved going to work there to interact with friends and patrons.

Judy enjoyed riding with Doug on their Harley, cooking for family and friends in their home, trips to the beach, sunshine, but most especially spending time with her grandchildren.

Surviving in addition to her husband Doug, is one daughter, Brittany A. (Kevin) Rose, of Gifford, two grandchildren Payton and Parker Rose, five sisters, Cindy Cooper, of North Platte NE, Ginger Coast, of Buffalo, Candy (Doyle) Bettis, of Mineral Wells TX, Sue (Douglas) Johnson, of Oil City, and Tammy (Jerome) Tingley, of Limestone, and many nieces and nephews.

Family will be receiving friends on Tuesday May 8, 2018, from 5:00pm to 7:00pm in the Hilltop Baptist Church, at 7:00pm a Celebration of Life will be held with Rev. Max Simms Pastor, officiating.

Funeral arrangements are under the direction of the Hollenbeck-Cahill Funeral Homes.

Memorial contributions, if desired, may be made to American Cancer Society 2115 West 38th St. Erie, PA 16508.

On line condolences may be made at www.hollenbeckcahill.com

PA Permit Violation Issued

PA Permit Violation Issued to Eclipse Resources Pa Lp in Westfield Twp, Tioga County

Environmental Health & Safety violation issued on 2018-05-03 to Eclipse Resources Pa Lp in Westfield Twp, Tioga county. CSL 402(b) - POTENTIAL POLLUTION - Conducting an activity regulated by a permit issued pursuant to Section 402 of The Clean Streams Law to prevent the potential of pollution to waters of the Commonwealth without a permit or contrary to a permit issued ..
Tags: PADEP, frack, violation, drilling

Mr. McGarvey was a lifetime resident of Port Allegany.

Richard D. McGarvey

Richard D. McGarvey, 66, passed away Friday (May 4, 2018) in UPMC Cole, Coudersport, PA.
US Army Vet

Born January 17, 1952, in Salem, OR, he was a son of Robert D. and Donna Manning McGarvey. On May 6, 1972, in Port Allegany, he married Sandra L. Walker, who survives.

Mr. McGarvey was a lifetime resident of the area, and a graduate of Port Allegany High School, class of 1969.

Richard was a veteran, having served with the US Army. He was a security agent and medic instructor for 21 years, before his retirement.

Richard worked as a machinist with the former Pittsburgh Corning Co., Port Allegany, before retiring. He also volunteered as an EMT with Port Area Ambulance Service for 31 years, and most recently worked for Priority Care, Smethport, for 6 years.

He was a member of the First Baptist Church of Port Allegany, VFW Post 6391, Port Allegany, former member of National Registry Emergency Medical Tech/Military. He was an instructor with the American Heart Association, and American Red Cross, where he donated 18 gal. of blood. He was an active and life member of the Port Area Ambulance Service, where he was past director for 31 years (since 1980), also a life member of Port Allegany Fire Dept., since 1970.

Surviving in addition to his wife, Sandra, are two daughters, Deborah A. Bachman and Danielle E. (Jay) Higgins both of Port Allegany; 8 grandchildren: Kyle, Lindsay, and Caitlin Bachman, Cory and Carter Billyard, Brianna, Brittany, and Jacob Higgins; four great grandchildren; three brothers, Robert L. (Penny) McGarvey, Ronald V. (Stephanie) McGarvey, and Russell D. (Lola Freer) McGarvey all of Port Allegany; a sister, Rhonda F. (Mark) Hepfer of Gifford, PA; and several nieces and nephews.

He was preceded in death by his parents, an infant daughter, Denise L. McGarvey, and a son-in-law, Dana Bachman.

Friends will be received from 2-4 and 6-8 p.m. Sunday in the Switzer Funeral Home, Port Allegany, where a funeral service will be held at 11 a.m. Monday with Rev. Michael Culver, pastor of the First Baptist Church, officiating. Burial will be in Grimes Cemetery, Port Allegany.

A military service will be held immediately following the funeral service at the funeral home, by the Port Allegany Honor Guard.

Memorials can be made to a charity of the donor’s choice.

Condolences can be made to: Sandra McGarvey
4893 Route 155
Port Allegany, PA 16743

John W. Hayes, Jr., 87, of 1 Elmwood Ave., Bradford, PA

John W. Hayes, Jr.

John W. Hayes, Jr., 87, of 1 Elmwood Ave., Bradford, PA passed away, Thursday, May 3, 2018, peacefully, at The Pavilion at BRMC, surrounded by his family.
Korean War Vet

Born March 17, 1931 in Jacksonburg, WV, he was the son of the late John W. Sr. and Ruth (Brown) Hayes.

On March 10, 1962, in Hartford, CT, he married Julia W. (Warzinski) Hayes, who survives.

John was a 1948 graduate of Pine Grove High School and was a 1981 graduate of the University of Pittsburgh @ Bradford. He served in the U.S. Air Force in the Korean War until he was honorably discharged in 1954.

He was employed as a Lab Tech at Allegany Energy Greensburg, Pa.,

John was an avid Pittsburgh Pirates and Steelers fans and a member of the NRA

Surviving in addition to his wife Julia of 56 years, is one daughter, Jessica (Steve) Hervatin, of Lewis Run, and two sons, John W. (Claudia) Hayes III, of Germany, and George M.(Laura) Hayes, of Limestone, NY. one sister, Evelyn Coning,of Westerville OH, one brother, Steven (Suzie) Hayes, of Sardis, OH. five grandchildren, three great grandchildren, and several nieces and nephews.

He was preceded in death by his parents, four brothers, and one sister.

Family will receive friends on Monday, May 7, 2018 from 4:00pm to 6:00pm in the Hollenbeck-Cahill Funeral Homes Inc. 372 East Main Street, at which time funeral service will be held with Rev. Stanley Swacha, Senior Associate of St. Bernard Church officiating. Committal services, Military Honors will be accorded by members of the American Legion Post 108 on Tuesday at 1:00pm in St. Bernard Mausoleum.

Funeral arrangements are under the direction of the Hollenbeck-Cahill Funeral Homes Inc.

Hundreds without power in Roulette Township, restoration not expected until midnight Saturday

Roulette has been out of power since the storm yesterday afternoon and it is not expected to be restored until midnight tonight. We are functioning on a limited basis via cellphone. Sorry for any inconvenience to our readers. If you have any friends or loved ones dependent on electric for medical needs, you may want to check on them.

Olson & Tenglund, Inc. Seeking Parts Clerk In Smethport, PA


Public Auction Sunday, May 6th At Lloyd Burkhouse Auction House in Bradford, PA


Gee's Blueberry Hill Farm Season Opener Saturday In Smethport, PA


SMC Powder Metallurgy Seeking A Qualified Utility Person At Galeton, PA Plant


McKean County Family Raceway Opening Night Saturday, May 5th In Smethport, PA


IU#9 Positions Are Available Supporting & Educating Students In North Central PA




Consignments Welcome For Carter's Spring Consignment Auction on Saturday, May 19th


Friday, May 4, 2018

MULTIPLE REPORTS OF TREES DOWN ON WIRES AS STORM APPROACHES

STORM WARNINGS NOW OUT FOR POTTER COUNTY
At 5:15 PM on Friday,  Lafayette & Mt. Jewett Fire Departments and Bradford City Ambulance have been dispatched to a tree down on a 36 year old male trapped under a fallen tree on Forestry Road 122, 1 1/2 miles west of Westline on Triple C road.
5:23--SEVERE THUNDERSTROM WARNING FOR ELK & CAMERON COUNTIES.

Plant Sale At Galeton School Greenhouse Saturday

Come to the Galeton School Greenhouse for your Spring hanging baskets and plants. Open Saturday at 9:30am. Don’t forget mom for Mother’s Day.


Summer youth programs offer fun learning opportunities

DuBOIS - Penn State DuBois is offering fun and educational classes in June for students going into grades 6 – 12. There are four new academy programs offered during the weeks of June 18, and June 25. These programs include topics in crime, law, art, creative writing, music, theatre, wildlife technology, ranger studies, wilderness medicine, science, technology, engineering, and meteorology.

Crime and Law Academy: In the crime module, students will study a crime scene with various experts from law enforcement. They will learn what investigators look for and how evidence is disseminated and finally given to those in the judicial system. In the law module, students will prepare for a mock trial by practicing debating skills and preparing as an attorney, witness, defendant, etc. Finally, a mock trial will take place with all students participating and Judge John Foradora in attendance.

Interpretive Arts Academy: This academy allows those students with a high level of creativity to use it with others who share their passion. Students will be asked to read a book of their choice prior to class. Using their knowledge of the book, the students will move through the various modules to express their knowledge, feelings, etc. of the work. This academy will include creative writing, art, music, and theatre modules.

Wildlife Academy: GPS tracking used in natural resources and recreation and radio telemetry used by wildlife researchers to track animals will be highlighted in day one of the Wildlife Technology module. Day two of this module will include a hands-on approach to marking, research, and survey methods with a biologist in a small wetland. Students will learn new skills for outdoor survival in the Ranger Studies module. Finally, students will learn the basics of first aid and identifying wild plants in the Wilderness Medicine module. Students are asked to dress for the outdoors in this highly interactive program.

Science and Technology Academy: This academy includes a chemistry module with candy making to help students understand material composition. The computer technology module will show students how to access their home computers remotely from another computer or their phone. The engineering module will include Lego Robotics and give students experience with exercises used in the Best Robotics completion. The Meteorology module will take place at the Weather Discovery Center in Punxsutawney where students will explore the science and folklore of meteorology by interacting with hands-on exhibits. Students will delve deeper into the science of lightning and thunder to learn what a lightning flash really is, what the different types of lightning are, the relationship between lightning and thunder, and much more.

Class fees have been reduced due to a generous contribution from the Anita D. McDonald Endowment for the Support of Children and Youth. Scholarship money donated from the community is also available for those who are in financial need. Please contact 814-375-4715 for more information, or go online to http://dubois.psu.edu/Outreach-Youth-Programs to register.


Assistant Teaching Professor of Chemistry Francelys Medina instructs student Julia Wirths of DuBois in one of last year's youth courses. This year a chemistry themed class will be used to make candy through fun and educational lessons.

Capitol Update

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Capitol Update
Friday, May 04, 2018 The latest news from the State Capitol
                          
 
Committee OKs Bill to Ensure Reasonable Regulation of Conventional Oil and Gas Industry

Continuing the years-long effort to ensure separate regulations for the conventional and unconventional oil and gas industries, this week the House Environmental Resources and Energy Committee approved my bill creating the Conventional Oil and Gas Wells Act.

The bill recognizes that deep-well drilling in the Marcellus Shale and shallow well drilling are two very different processes and that placing them under the same set of regulations simply doesn’t make sense.

House Bill 2154 strikes an appropriate balance by removing the weight of unreasonable and unnecessary regulations from the backs of our conventional producers while still ensuring the environment is protected. Without this bill, the industry and all it contributes to our local and state economies, not to mention the thousands of jobs it supports across our region, will remain at risk.

Read more about the bill here.
                
         
Logger Safety Course Planned in Mt. Jewett

The Allegheny Hardwood Utilization Group (AHUG) and North Central Pennsylvania Regional Planning and Development Commission are teaming up to offer an Advanced Logger Rescue program on Friday, May 18, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Mt. Jewett Firehall, 2 Gallup Ave. in Mt. Jewett.

A nationally recognized and awarded safety training program, Logger Rescue offers training in all aspects of logger education. The course was founded in Berlin, NJ, in 1987 to meet the needs of the forest products industry and for those companies that have to comply with OSHA standards. Advance Logger Rescue is a program that teaches all participants how to handle an “in woods” rescue from the time a person is injured until they are at a level 1 Trauma Center.

Space is limited and pre-registration is required. The cost is $50 per person. Continuing education credits for PA SFI and fire and EMS are available.

To register, call 814-837-8550 or email bchardwood@earthlink.net. For questions or more information, contact Susan Swanson, AHUG executive director, at 814-837-8550 or by email at hardwood@penn.com. The deadline to register is May 11.
                  
         
Welcome Leadership Elk and Cameron!


It was a pleasure to welcome members of Leadership Elk and Cameron (LEC) to the state Capitol this week. LEC is a great program aimed at helping participants learn more about the strengths and weaknesses of the region in order to develop informed, civic-oriented volunteers to help direct the future of Elk and Cameron counties. Interested? Learn more here!
                  
         
Thanks for Coming!


We had a great turnout for the Firearms Safety and Rights Seminar in Shinglehouse last week! I thank everyone who came out and hope you found the discussion helpful and informative. Pictured with me above are our two presenters, Potter County District Attorney Andy Watson and Deputy Sheriff Larry Goodwin, as well as Shinglehouse Police Officer Ruben Donovan.
                  
         
‘The Wall That Heals’ to Arrive at State Capitol Next Week

“The Wall That Heals,” a replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., and an accompanying mobile Education Center, will be displayed on the State Capitol Grounds Wednesday, May 9, through Sunday, May 13.

The display will begin with an opening ceremony at 7 p.m. on May 9, and closing at 2 p.m. on May 13. The display will be open 24 hours each day, and admission is free.

Learn more in the video below.

Click here to view video.
                  
         
Getting Monthly Medications at Once

As a way to help senior citizens and others who take monthly maintenance medications, the House this week passed legislation that would allow customers to synchronize the refilling of their prescription drug medications.

House Bill 1800 would make filling prescriptions more convenient, as it would eliminate multiple visits to the pharmacy by allowing all prescriptions to be filled on the same day each month. Different refill dates throughout the month can make it difficult, especially for those who use public transportation, to pick up their medicine.

Studies have shown that when medications are not synchronized, a reduction in taking medications as prescribed occurs.

Currently, consumers can request this synchronization, but this bill simply puts the practice into state law and prohibits an insurance company from denying coverage for a partial fill of a script in order to facilitate medication synchronization. Thirty-five other states have enacted or introduced similar legislation.

The bill now goes to the Senate for its consideration.