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Wednesday, September 16, 2020

WELLSBORO GROWERS MARKET IS EXTENDED TO THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29; THIS THURSDAY, SEPT. 17 FEATURES GROWIN’ NATIVE PLANTS AND KEENEY FARM PUMPKINS

Photo by John Eaton
Ann Vayansky prepares some of the shrubs, small trees and perennial flowers she will be bringing to the Wellsboro Growers Market this Thursday, Sept. 17 and on Oct. 1. All are native to this area and ready for planting this fall.

 Thomas Putnam, organizer, has announced that the Wellsboro Growers Market will be open from 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. every Thursday through Oct. 29 rather than ending on Oct. 8 as originally planned.

"We opened later than normal this year due to the coronavirus," he said. "So, we made the decision to keep it going through the end of October on the front lawn of the First Presbyterian Church at 130 Main Street in Wellsboro, weather permitting."

Keeney Farm is bringing traditional, porcelain doll and blue doll pumpkins to the market for the first time this Thursday, Sept. 17.
Photo by John Eaton
Cheryl and Gary Keeney are shown with some of the traditional, porcelain doll and blue doll pumpkins and vegetables they will be bringing to this Thursday's Wellsboro Growers Market on Sept. 17.

Ann Vayansky of Growin’ Native is returning on Sept. 17 for the second Thursday in a row. She was at the Sept. 10 market for the first time since the end of June and plans to be back again on Oct. 1. She is bringing at least 11 different shrubs, small trees and perennial flowers, all native to North Central Pennsylvania and all hosts for insects, such as the butterfly caterpillar and/or pollinators that attract bees. "Fall is the perfect time to plant them to have blooms and berries next year. If you want to attract butterflies and birds, these will help," she said.

Vayansky described those she was sure she would have with her. "Sneezeweed is in the sunflower family, is a perennial with yellow or orange daisy-like petals but doesn't make you sneeze," she laughed. "At one time its leaves were dried and used to make snuff. That's how it got its name. Swamp milkweed, a perennial with pink flowers, attracts monarch butterflies and grows to about three feet tall." Anise Hyssop is a perennial with blue flowers and fragrant foliage that self-seeds and is easy-to-grow.

The black-eyed Susan, also in the sunflower family, has daisy-like blooms, is hearty, drought-tolerant and responds well to an occasional watering. Purple Coneflowers are in the daisy family, colorful, adaptable and grow best in poor soil.

"The obedient plant got its name because gardeners can bend its individual pink flowers in any direction. It is also a pollinator and a great plant to use to fill in bare spots because it spreads easily," said Vayansky. "Ninebark is named because of its bark, which adds interest to winter gardens. Its colorful dark green or reddish leaves emerge in mid-spring and last well into fall. Winterberry produces lots of bright red berries that really show up in fall and winter landscapes."

Indian Currant, also known as Coralberry, has coral-colored berries and is a shrub used to naturalize areas or as an informal shrub border. "Redbud is a shrub or small tree that has pink flowers and is the first to bloom in spring. It prefers sun. The Serviceberry is a shrub or small tree that blooms in spring with white flowers and leaves that turn red in the fall," Vayansky said.

Also at this Thursdays market will be fresh vegetables, such as lettuce, red and green tomatoes, sweet and hot peppers, potatoes, broccoli florets, cauliflower, kohlrabi, okra, summer and winter squash and for the first time this year, pumpkins; homemade baked goods, such as pecan sandies, cinnamon buns, breads, bagels, pound cakes in different flavors, carrot and zucchini chocolate cakes and cookies along with jams and jellies, tomato relish and jalapeno pepper spread, wine tastings and Staggering Unicorn wines sold by the bottle, candles, soaps and other products.

Market vendors are: Aunt Lulu's Embroidery, Yorkshire Meadows, Bakery 303, Staggering Unicorn Winery, the Shortsville Green Growers, Scentillating Creations, Hillstone Farms, Udder Merry Mac Farm, Keeney Farm, Pinafore Run Farm, New View Farm, Between Two Rivers Maple Products, and WindStone Landing Farms.

Customers are asked to wear face coverings and maintain six feet of distance from others.

Vendors interested in participating are asked to call Thomas Putnam at 570-439-2000 or email wellsborogrowersmarket@gmail.com.

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